Please follow the links bellow to watch the full version of the docudrama “Do it like a European?” created by communications studies students for young people. It is a non-partisan attempt to cover contemporary ideas, and young people’s hopes for Europe on the eve of the 2009 elections to the European Parliament in a way that appeals to young audiences.

Watch the film in High Definition!

Do it like a European? – PART ONE

Do it like a European? – PART TWO

Do it like a European? – PART THREE

Do it like a European? – PART FOUR

Do it like a European? – PART FIVE

Do it like a European? – PART SIX

A production celebrating the 50th anniversary of the European Parliament and 30 years since the first Euro-elections, presented by the Jean Monnet European of Excellence and the JMECE Lab at the University of Leeds, UK. A production supported by a grant from the European Parliament.

Please send us your feedback at cla7sm@leeds.ac.uk or csfbs@leeds.ac.uk

The European Parliament, the European Union and the 2009 election of the European Parliament by direct universal suffrage in free elections since 1979 has always posed a challenge to those seeking to inform voters that they personally elect candidates to serve as Members of the European Parliament.

In Britain, turnout has always been low. Many people are unaware of the impending elections on 4 June 2009. Many of the students who produced this dvd were equally unaware at the outset and equally unaware that they could vote on 4 June 2009 to elect Members of the European Parliament to represent their region. So we decided to find out more.

We produced an experimental dvd written by us for young, potential first time voters. In the process of discovery and production, the importance of voting in 4 June 2009 in the elections to the European Parliament became increasingly clear.

The European Parliament influences EU legislation. Our MEPs influence the legislation that affects us all. On 4 June 2009, we have the opportunity to vote.

The dvd reflects our interpretations of Europe. We thank the European Parliament, and all those who made it possible for us to discover why voting on 4 June 2009 matters, and why voting gives all of us an opportunity to play our part in shaping the future. Responsibility for the content remains ours.

All the materials are part of the activities promoted by the Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence at the University of Leeds, and the JMECE Lab, at the Institute of Communications Studies.

Please fell free to distribute the dvd among peers online.

Script/production supervisors: Stergios Mavrikis & Fabro Steibel.

Initial Idea: JMECE Lab members: May Jacobs, Stergios Mavrikis, Agnes Inge Schneeberger, Fabro Steibel, Anna Zoellner.

Producer: Vivienne Errington-Barnes, Ass. Producer: Maya Manwaring, Writer: Nick Miller, Director: Ali Dickinson, Camera: Joe Davis, A.D.:Anna Spragg, D.O.P: Charles Woods, Editor: Will Lock, Script Political Supervisor: Luke Errington-Barnes, Hair & Make-up: Jessie Young, P.D.: Laura Smith, Special Effects: Will Lock, Composer: Howard Carter, Ass. Writer: Emma Brown, Lighting: Tom Lane, Lighting Ass.: Jonny Hughes, Boom/Grip: Alex Darwin, Ass. Script Political Supervisor: Sundeep Kumar, Production Design Ass.: Cameron Carswell, Costume: Jinny Howarth, Costume Ass.: Klaudia Stoniek, Researcher (film): Amy Moorcroft, Production Ass.: Cristina Cretu, Runner: Teresa Lee, Runner: Edmund Perou, Runner: Lucy Dixon, Sound Editor: Lee Charallah, Animation Composer: Callum Oliver.

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Welcome to the 7th JMECE Lab newsletter

The Jean Monnet European Centre of Excellence Lab (www.jmecelab.com) at the Institute of Communications Studies (University of Leeds) is pleased to announce the publication of a new JMECE Lab newsletter Feb. 2010.

In this issue (download it HERE):

  • “The Spanish EU Presidency: Fasten your seatbelts!” by Francisco Seoane Pérez, journalist, PhD candidate, Spain
  • The JMECE docudrama “Do it like a European?” wins prize at the international Winton Film Contest
  • “Building Europe from the End of the World” by Francisco Seoane Pérez, journalist, PhD candidate, Spain
  • “The European Elections in Austria: blame it on the media or is Brussels just too far… away?” by Daniel Nagel. PhD candidate, editor for the Austrian CISG database, Austria
  • “Talking to Margot Wallström online” by Stergios Mavrikis, journalist, PhD candidate, Greece
  • “Why I am a Pirate” by Daniel Östlund, Pirate Party member, Sweden
  • “The Lisbon express” by George Tassiopoulos, PhD candidate in political science, France
  • “Europhobes and Europhiles: a new type of info-war in Plato’s cave” by Stergios Mavrikis, journalist, PhD candidate, Greece
  • “Conservative naivety on Europe” by Toni Giugliano, political researcher at the Scottish Parliament, Scotland/UK
  • “The media and the European Union: “Europe is maybe not sexy” (Wallström, 2008)” by Bruno Martin Hoyer, ICS MA student studying “Communicating Europe”, Germany
  • “The European Commission may be trying too hard to convince us” by Geoff Martin, Special Adviser to the Commonwealth Secretary General on Strategic Relationships, UK
  • State of the Art, The Condition of Liberty & The Art of Objection, 18th – 28th May 2009, Berlaymont Building, Brussels, Curated by Sami Jalili, Belgium

About to the JMECE LAB newsletter:

JMECELAB newsletter is produced by postgraduates researching the European Union. It reflects a particular interest in EU media policies, European identity (from the perspective of individual people in the EU states, and its international identity) and how these identities are mediated by printed and electronic media. Other areas of particular interest include EU egovernance, EU reform, security and diplomacy, EU multilateralism and trade as exemplified by EU-China relations, climate change and socio-legal developments. We welcome articles from readers in the region and around the world on any aspect of EU affairs, EU research, academic events and policy initiatives.

To subscribe to the JMECELAB Newsletter or for any other enquires please contact: Stergios Mavrikis at cla7sm@leeds.ac.uk

Inside this special issue on European elections 2009: “Vote or let someone else decide for you”

Inside this special issue on European elections 2009: “Vote or let someone else decide for you”

The 6th newsletter of the JMECE Lab (www.jmecelab.com) at the Institute of Communications Studies (University of Leeds) is available online HERE:

Inside this special issue on European elections 2009: “Vote or let someone else decide for you”:

– “What the main party groups in the European Parliament say…” Read their political manifestos

– “European Elections 2009 : A coup de Poker” by George Tassiopoulos, PhD candidate in political science University of East-Paris

– “Think I’m Turning European” by Josef Litobarski, postgraduate student of European and International Studies, University of Trento, Italy

– “Making Europe Work for Women” by Nathalie Henry, ICS PhD candidate, Heidrun Herzogenrath-Amelung, ICS MA student, Pinelopi Troullinou, ICS MA student, Francisco Seoane Perez, ICS PhD candidate

– “The European eParticipation study” by Simon Smith, Research Associate, Institute of Communications Studies

– “Yorkshire MEPs: European politics are politics as normal”

– Book presentation: “Crossroad Europe”: cultural differences in text and images by Bruno van den Elshout, journalist, the Netherlands

JMECE Lab news:

  • “Leeds at the Agora of the Women of Europe prizewinners”, Rhodes, April 2009
  • “30 May 2009 / Euro elections 2009 Promotional Event: St Mary’s spring fair, Middleton, Leeds”
  • “22 May 2009 / Euro elections 2009 JMECE Lab Events: Leeds University Campus & Leeds City Centre”
EU election and voting links released by JMECE Lab

EU election and voting links released by JMECE Lab

JMECE Lab presents a selection of online sources aiming to share European Elections 2009 campaing onlne links and other useful EU websites. To access the publication, click here or download it from here http://www.box.net/shared/jbng3vkpk8

We would  like to invite you to watch the following short interviews with EU officials and others interested in the future of Europe and the forthcoming Euro-elections filmed and edited by the JMECE LAB team on the eve of the 2009 elections to the European Parliament in a way that appeals to young audiences. 

Feel free to use that material online on your blogs and websites.

Communicating Europe, reaching out to EU citizens – PART ONE

Communicating Europe, reaching out to EU citizens – PART TWO

Communicating Europe, reaching out to EU citizens – PART THREE

Communicating Europe, reaching out to EU citizens – PART FOUR

Interviewees:

Sarah Lambert, Acting Head of Representation European Commission in UK

Andrew Robinson, Honorary Consul, French Embassy in UK

Caroline Flint, Minister for Europe in UK

Maurice Gourdault-Montagne, Ambassador of France to the United Kingdom

Diana Johnson, Labour MEP for Hull North

Per Augustsson Minister, Deputy Chief of Mission Political and European Affairs, Embassy of Sweden in UK

• Detective Inspector Phil Butler, Northumbria Police

David Fortune, Chief Inspector

Christian Krappitz, European Commission Representation in UK

• Ambassador Georg Ambassador of Germany to the United Kingdom

Jan Winkler, Late Ambassador for the Czech Republic to the United Kingdom

Maureen Foers, Yorkshire Women Entrepreneurs

Borbála Czakó, Ambassador of Hungary to the United Kingdom

• Dr Richard Corbett, Labour MEP for Yorkshire and Humber

Les Parkes, Deputy Chair, European Movement, Yorkshire Branch

• JMECE Lab members Juliet Lodge, Fabro Steibel, Stergios Mavrikis, Francisco S. Perez, Amy Moorcroft

Conference theme: In June 2009 European citizens will elect a new European Parliament, some of them who joined the European Union only recently for the first time.

Conference theme: In June 2009 European citizens will elect a new European Parliament, some of them who joined the European Union only recently for the first time.

17 – 18 September 2009

The conference will be organised by the ECREA Political Communication section, the Centre for Digital Citizenship and the Jean Monnet European Centre of Excellence at the Institute of Communications Studies.

Conference theme: In June 2009 European citizens will elect a new European Parliament, some of them who joined the European Union only recently for the first time.

2009 will also see numerous national elections throughout Europe. The Political Communication section will take this important election year in Europe as an opportunity to revisit one of the key areas of political communication research – how democratic participation is shaped and transformed by processes of mediatisation and what consequences this has for the nature of contemporary citizenship.

The nature of democratic citizenship is presently undergoing fundamental changes, which are assumed to have far-reaching consequences for the way democracy works. The relationship between citizens and their elected representatives seems to be characterized by growing distance, mistrust and ignorance. Long gone are the days of an ideal (or idealized) Athenian polity where political engagement was regarded a virtue and daily life was permeated by political debate.

Instead, a growing number of citizens has withdrawn from politics and doesn’t even find it worth the while to follow the news or to cast their vote. Meanwhile, the enthusiasm that initially inspired the citizens of the new democracies in Eastern Europe has evaporated and we now see similar patterns of disenchantment in these countries like in their established counterparts. Media organisations and political actors have responded to these developments in various ways – so far without significant success. Turnout continues to drop, and news programmes, in particular current affairs programmes, are losing their audiences.

Are modern democracies, then, left without citizens, as Robert Entman suggested twenty years ago? The question is even more urgent with regard to the European Union, which for a long time has been largely ignored by its citizens, but is now at risk to be rejected altogether, as the recent No votes in the referenda in Ireland, France and the Netherlands demonstrate.

However, the situation might be more ambiguous and complex. While citizens are withdrawing from institutionalized politics and established channels of communication new arenas of participation and new forms of communicating political ideas have emerged, which for many – in particular the young – appear more meaningful and more trustworthy. In particular the Internet has opened up new spaces for democratic citizenship from the local to the global level that could not have been dreamed of twenty years ago.

The ECREA Political Communication sectional workshop aims to provide a forum to discuss these themes with scholars who are working on the changing nature of citizenship, political involvement and the media both in the European and the national context.

Call for Papers

We invite empirical as well as theoretical papers that contribute to understanding contemporary democratic citizenship and the role of the media, old and new, in shaping the way it is experienced and practiced. We are particularly interested in papers that address the following aspects:

* European citizenship: media and perceptions of Europe; Participation and vote choice in European elections and referenda.

* The ballot box and beyond: media and national electoral politics; non-institutionalised participation; non-voting and political disengagement.

* Communicating to citizens: Mediated and mediatised political messages; implications for political information and participation.

* Making sense of politics: citizens’ response to political information; information processing and civic knowledge.

* Conceptualizing citizenship (European, national): relationship between media and citizenship; lay understanding of citizenship.

Submission of contributions: Abstracts of not more than 500 words should be sent to ics-conferences@leeds.ac.uk, mentioning ‘Mediated citizenship’ in the subject line. Deadline: 15 May 2009 If you wish to propose a whole panel please get in touch with Dr. Katrin Voltmer at k.voltmer@leeds.ac.uk

Key note (Thursday afternoon) Prof. Peter Dahlgren – Lund University, Sweden: “Mediated Democracy and the Centrality of Civic Identities and Practices”

Please download registration form and send to ics-conferences@leeds.ac.uk

Contact: Dr. Katrin Voltmer (academic organiser) Houldsworth Building, Room 3.50 Institute of Communications Studies University of Leeds Leeds, LS2 9JT United Kingdom Email: k.voltmer@leeds.ac.uk Tel: +44-(0)113-3435829 Fax: +44-(0)113-3435808

jmece_lab_event

Yorkshire MEPs: European politics are politics as normal

ICS Prof Juliet Lodge, Dr Richard Corbett, MEP Labour, Diana Wallis, MEP Liberal Democrat and Mark Green, Honorary German Consul at the Conference "You and the future of democracy in the EU"

ICS Prof Juliet Lodge, Dr Richard Corbett, MEP Labour, Diana Wallis, MEP Liberal Democrat and Mark Green, Honorary German Consul at the Conference "You and the future of democracy in the EU"

Why bother voting in the next European elections? Two Yorkshire MEPs offered the following arguments at a conference on the future of EU democracy held in Leeds on Friday, 13 March 2009: First, because the European Parliament is the institution that democratically controls policies related to issues like climate change and the current economic crisis, which cannot be dealt with by individual countries alone. Second, because the European chamber offers real political options where members decide in accordance with their ideological positions, irrespective of their country of origin.

This was the rationale offered by Yorkshire MEPs Richard Corbett (Labour) and Diana Wallis (Liberal Democrat) at a public event at the Leeds Civic Hall focused on the practical implications of European politics for the younger generation. Participants included university and local secondary school students, who viewed the first screening of a student-produced DVD “Do it like a European?” about the importance of voting in the June 4th European Parliament elections.

This conference, celebrating 30 years of the first elections to the European Parliament, ended with a cautionary tale : if you do not vote, you let someone else choose for you. Whom they choose will affect policy priorities and outcomes. If you do not vote, you open the door to less democratic or extremist elements, a real possibility in Yorkshire.

Panel 4: European Union from the citizen's perspective: Dr Alina Dobreva (researcher), Christina Michael (journalist), Dr Katharine Sarikakis (ICS Senior Lecturer),  Neill Schofield (European Movement) and Lynette Falconer (Leeds Europe Direct)

Panel 4: European Union from the citizen's perspective: Dr Alina Dobreva (researcher), Christina Michael (journalist), Dr Katharine Sarikakis (ICS Senior Lecturer), Neill Schofield (European Movement), Dr Simon Lightfoot (Senior Lecturer in European Politics) and Lynette Falconer (Leeds Europe Direct)

Invited to speak at a round-table organised by the Jean Monnet European Centre of Excellence (JMECE) and the JMECE Lab at the University of Leeds, one of the Labour MEPs for the Yorkshire and the Humber region, Dr Richard Corbett, said the European Parliament could be seen as a democratic response to one of the biggest challenges posed by economic globalisation: How to take decisions beyond the nation-state. “Rather than having diplomats make decisions for us, we have elected representatives who decide on issues that European countries cannot deal with on their own, as in the case of climate change”, said Dr Corbett.

Besides, decisions at the European Parliament are contested among political groups that divide ideologically, as in any other parliament, rather than by the nationality of their members. “A Swede Green MEP has much more in common with a French Green MEP than with a Swede Conservative MEP”, argued Dr Corbett.

“The European Parliament”, he said, “is about real political choices. In the end, you have to choose between those who want a regulated common market, and those who want a free-for-all market with few protections for consumers.”

The Labour MEP also warned about the risk of the region electing a BNP member for the European Parliament. It would be a shame for the UK, he said, to endow a fascist politician with all the extra legitimacy and the resources of European parliamentary representation.

Panel 2: Communicating Europe? Goeffrey Martin (Special adviser to the Commonwealth Secretary on Strategic Relationships), ICS Prof Juliet Lodge, Judith Stamper (Principal Teaching Fellow in Broadcast Journalism) and DCI Dave Fortune

Panel 2: Communicating Europe? Geoffrey Martin (Special adviser to the Commonwealth Secretary on Strategic Relationships), ICS Prof Juliet Lodge, Judith Stamper (Principal Teaching Fellow in Broadcast Journalism) and DCI Dave Fortune

Diana Wallis, the Liberal Democrat MEP for the Yorkshire and the Humber region illustrated how political choices are reflected in the European Parliament. She reflected on the ideological division between environmental “purists”, who oppose the use of any fossil fuels for producing energy, and those who, like her, would like to reach clean energy production “bit by bit”, allowing coal-reliant regions like Yorkshire to engage in low-emission energy projects like those related to carbon capture and storage. “Europe is about politics as normal”, Wallis remarked, “the sort of politicians you get into Europe, the sort of politics you’ll get out.” She argued that the current economic crisis, along with the challenges of climate change, may offer a good opportunity for the EU to show its relevance in this borderless world. “What we need is leadership” she said. “If you elect politicians who are isolationists, you won’t get the achievements of the past few years.”

Tomorrow’s EU: More participatory, but never a fully-fledged federation

The DVD screened at the event, titled “Do it like a European?” was conceived by the JMECE Lab and written, produced, shot and edited by students from the Institute of Communications Studies and the JMECE . In the next days the short film will be available on line. So, stay tuned.

The DVD screened at the event, titled “Do it like a European?” was conceived by the JMECE Lab and written, produced, shot and edited by students from the Institute of Communications Studies and the JMECE . The film will be soon available on line. So, stay tuned.

In response to questions from the public, the two Yorkshire MEPs gave their opinion on the proposals for a more participatory democracy, and about the prospects of the EU becoming the United States of Europe. Diana Wallis said: “We need to spend time reassessing representative democracy, which I think it is partially broke. It was devised for the age of the horse and the cart, when your representative would go to the parliament and then would report back. We live in a different world now. The politician is in need of the help of citizens.” She supported the idea of the European Citizens Initiative, a proposal to grant citizens the right to set off the legislative process if they manage to get a million signatures from across the EU member states. Having citizens from all over Europe supporting a legislative proposal should be the closest thing to a “European demos”, she said, as there would be citizens from different states collaborating in a common goal.

Dr Corbett was more sceptical. Dr Corbett said the EU faced “a problem of space”: “European institutions are inevitably and unavoidably more distant, that’s why you should not take to the EU level issues that can be solved at the local or national level.” He argued that good ideas don’t need one million signatures to get into the EU policy-making process. There are other channels, like the MEPs themselves or the European Parliament’s Petitions Committee, to listen to citizens’ demands, said Dr Corbett.

Simon Duffin, Press Officer of the UK Office of the European Parliament talking about "The European Parliament in perspective"

Simon Duffin, Press Officer of the UK Office of the European Parliament talking about "The European Parliament in perspective"

As for the EU becoming the United States of this side of the Atlantic, Diana Wallis warned “we should not try to imitate the USA, because we are different.” In her view, the idea of a federal union is “passé and old fashioned” and has already been “thrown away”.

Dr Corbett said in a humorous way that the EU is “a Europe of States who are sometimes united, so up to a point we already have a United States of Europe.” As the former president of the Young European Federalists, Dr Corbett said he had never been afraid of using the word “federal”, as “a federation is about having different levels of government, being as decentralised as possible, and centralised only when necessary.” He said the idea of a federation conveyed, thanks in part to the British mass media, the image of a highly centralised state. He argued that although the EU already has federal characteristics epitomized by the European Court of Justice, it was unlikely ever to become “a fully-fledged federation”.

The conference, titled “You and the Future of Democracy in Europe”, was organised by the Jean Monnet European Centre of Excellence (JMECE) and the JMECE Lab at the University of Leeds in conjunction with the UK Office of the European Parliament, the Europe Direct Centre in Leeds, and Leeds City Council.

In response to questions from the public, the two Yorkshire MEPs gave their opinion on the proposals for a more participatory democracy, and about the prospects of the EU becoming the United States of Europe.

In response to questions from the public, the two Yorkshire MEPs gave their opinion on the proposals for a more participatory democracy, and about the prospects of the EU becoming the United States of Europe.

The event included talks by Professor Juliet Lodge, Director of the JMECE; Simon Duffin, Head of Media at the UK Office of the European Parliament; Judith Stamper, Teaching Fellow in Broadcast Journalism at the Institute of Communications Studies, University of Leeds; Geoffrey Martin, Special Adviser to the Commonwealth Secretary on Strategic Relationships; Dave Fortune, Chief Inspector, Police Forces of Yorkshire; Mark Green, Honorary German Consul in the Yorkshire region; Dr Simon Lightfoot, Department of Politics, University of Leeds; Lynette Falconer, Information Manager, Europe Direct Leeds; Dr Alina Dobreva, European Commission stagiaire; Christina Michael, journalist working for the Cordis website; Neill Schofield, the European Movement and Dr Katharine Sarikakis, Senior Lecturer in Communications Policy at the Institute of Communications Studies, University of Leeds.

The DVD screened at the event, titled “Do it like a European?” was conceived by the JMECE Lab and written, produced, shot and edited by students from the Institute of Communications Studies and the JMECE . The short film will be soon available on line. So, stay tuned (www.jmecelab.com)

Check the programme HERE

Leeds Euro MP Richard Corbett

Leeds Euro MP Richard Corbett

News release from the Office of Richard Corbett, Labour MEP for Yorkshire & Humber

Labour Euro MP for Leeds, Richard Corbett, will talk about what the European Parliament has achieved for EU citizens, at the University of Leeds’ ‘You And The Future Of Democracy In Europe’ conference this Friday.

The conference is organised by the university’s Jean Monnet European Centre of Excellence and will also consider the forthcoming European elections, EU citizenship, communication within the EU and citizens’ perspectives of the EU.

Richard said: “It was MEPs that voted to give temporary workers the same rights as people on permanent contracts, a decision that improved the pay and rights at work of tens of thousands of people in just Leeds alone. It was MEPs that fought for and agreed the climate change package and it was MEPs that voted to provide the UK with EU money following the severe flooding of 2008. MEPs make a real difference to how EU legislation is shaped and because they are elected they provide a direct link between citizens and the EU itself.

“The European Parliament has made a massive impact on the way the EU is run and the way Europe-wide laws are agreed. The majority of proposed EU rules require the approval of the parliament and it is up to MEPs to either reject them outright or improve them by negotiation

Join us in the first online discussion on eParticipation organised jointly by PEP-NET and the European eParticipation Study

Join us in the first online discussion on eParticipation organised jointly by PEP-NET and the European eParticipation Study

Join us in the first online discussion on eParticipation organised jointly by PEP-NET and the European eParticipation Study. The online debate will take place on www.internet-discourse.eu from 10:00am CET Monday 2 March to Friday 13 March.

We hope you will actively contribute to our online discussion, and help us demonstrate the value of such activities in achieving specific and valuable outputs.

Although you will get most out of the process if you contribute regularly over the next two weeks, even irregular inputs will be welcome! Our objective with this online discussion is to arrive at a high quality analysis of a number of European eParticipation issues, plus recommendations as to how each should be addressed.

You can find out more about the ten issues proposed for this discussion in the Library section. These issues arise from the preliminary work of the European eParticipation Study. However, the online discussion is also open for you to raise your own separate issues if you wish.

Important parts of the website:

1) READ THIS BEFORE YOU BEGIN: Outlines the objectives, our definitions, the process and phases of the online discussion

2) FORUMS: Most of the contributions by participants will be made in either the main forum or in the sub forums. Participants can either start a new thread in any forum or add to already existing threads.

3) IDEAS LIST: The ideas list is to be used by participants who do not want to participate in an actual discussion but just want to leave a short comment or opinion. Other participants can vote on the different “ideas” which gives them a ranking structure.

4) LIBARY: In the library, the ten suggested issues can be found, as well as background information on each.

We look forward to your input on www.internet-discourse.eu

Article by Mirek Topolánek, Prime Minister of the Czech Republic, Presidency of the European Union between January and June 2009

Article by Mirek Topolánek, Prime Minister of the Czech Republic, Presidency of the European Union between January and June 2009

In the latest JMECE Lab newsletter we have the honour to include an article written exclusively for the JMECE Lab by Mirek Topolánek, Prime Minister of the Czech Republic, EU presidency of the European Union between January and June 2009.

INTRODUCTION: The motto of the Czech Republic EU presidency is “Europe without barriers”. The Czech Republic will be presiding over the meetings of EU-27 between January and June 2009. The main priorities of the Czech Presidency can be summed up as “the 3 E’s”: Economy, Energy and External Relations.

ARTICLE:

Over Prague, a giant metronome counts the time of the Czech Presidency. It stands on the site of a memorial to the Soviet dictator Stalin, put up with great pomp in the 1950s and then stealthily disposed of during one night. A megalomaniac statue of an autocrat that was to stand “forever” has been replaced by a subtle symbol of transience and the passing of time. True, it sometimes seizes up, which is a technical glitch, and the European Union flag has been twice damaged by vandals, which is being dealt with by the police (although the twelve stars on a blue background are not a “state symbol”), but the Czech Presidency goes on, works on fulfilling its priorities, the “3E’s” – the Economy, Energy and Europe in the world – and has also responded to unexpected events, which, for now, we refer to as the “2G’s” – Gaza and gas.

However, the metronome makes me also think of Fellini’s mock-documentary “Orchestra Rehearsal” in which the Italian director depicts a revolt of musicians who depose the conductor and replace him with a metronome. The director commented on the political metaphor by saying: “Before I hear it with my own ears, I cannot believe that such an inharmonious community of humans, metal and wood can coalesce into one single melody”. For the first half of 2009, the Czech Republic has chosen the slogan “Europe in sweet harmony”. This is to say that we consider our Presidency to be about a search for equilibrium and moderating joint debates rather than pushing through our own interests and ambitions. At the same time we wish our Presidency to be as open and transparent as possible. Of course, we cannot afford this in certain strategic or security-sensitive areas, but in principle we put more faith in dialogue than in monologue; the former is not only easier to listen to, but also to understand.

The European Union – or rather its institutions – are struggling against a crisis of trust. A thirty-year-long opinion poll, i.e. the elections to the European Parliament, show that this has been a long-term, consistent trend. The institutions try to act all the more decisively and convincingly, but whenever someone voices a different opinion or even criticises their actions, they often become wimpy – i.e. they reject even valid objections. Pressure for the ratification of the Lisbon Treaty or shuttling between the seats of the European Parliament are thus seen by the general public above all as symbols of obstinacy and unwillingness to listen.

True, for institutions to work together, they need rules to play by or, if you like, a common score and rhythm, and also somebody to make sure that these rules are respected, but, coming back to Fellini’s orchestra, I think it is symptomatic that the musicians often don’t share their conductor’s zeal for the cause and after some time tend to reject his authoritarianism. However, they realise that they need direction and consequently choose the metronome over the man.

“Over Prague, a giant metronome counts the time of the Czech Presidency. It stands on the site of a memorial to the Soviet dictator Stalin, put up with great pomp in the 1950s and then stealthily disposed of during one night."
“Over Prague, a giant metronome counts the time of the Czech Presidency. It stands on the site of a memorial to the Soviet dictator Stalin, put up with great pomp in the 1950s and then stealthily disposed of during one night.”

The error is manifest – the conductor had been stepping up his rigour and pressure as criticism directed at him grew, until he lost all backing. He could not bear the criticism nor the challenges; he responded with increasing authoritarianism. A bad communication strategy, we would say today. The apathy of Fellini’s musicians who say: “We have no deeper interests. What are we interested in? Nothing”, and the ensuing disunion are resolved by the impact of a wrecking ball which breaks through the walls of the chapel where the rehearsal is taking place. The conductor picks up his baton again but, instead of humility and respect for others, he starts voicing orders much more strongly than before. With a bit of exaggeration, we could say that the EU is also experiencing turbulence, which has been provoked by the financial crisis. If its institutions respect the different positions of the Member States, their respective situations and the different expectations of their inhabitants, they will boost their trustworthiness, but if they issue new orders that are binding on everybody without distinction, there will be yet another decrease in the turnout at this year’s elections to the European Parliament.

This is what the Czech Presidency brings forward for other EU Member States to consider. Let us not succumb to the momentary mood provoked by the impact of the economic crisis and let us not give up the functioning mechanisms. Let us not weaken the strength of the internal market and let us not undermine Europe’s competitiveness. Let us realise that musicians cannot do without technical rules or without a conductor, but everybody is responsible above all for tuning their instrument and for playing by the common score. I believe that in the end, the important relation is not that of metronome and conductor, but that of orchestra and audience. The tempo may vary but false notes are audible at once.

5-cover-page

Downloand the newsletter HERE

The 5th newsletter of the JMECE Lab (January-February) is available online at:

Download the 5th newsletter HERE

Inside this issue:

• “European Harmony – Conductor or metronome?” by Mirek Topolánek, Prime Minister of the Czech Republic, EU presidency of the European Union between January and June 2009 (front page)

• “The 10 commandments for efficient Communication with EU citizens” by Stergios Mavrikis, PhD candidate, ICS (page: 3)

• “Economic crisis, “the perfect excuse” to avoid environmental commitments ” Report by Francisco Seoane Perez, PhD candidate, ICS (page: 6)

• “Multilingualism: a long term investment for EU” by Nathalie Henry, PhD candidate, ICS (page: 7)

• Movers and Shakers: The making of the European Parliament, by Juliet Lodge, Director Jean Monnet European Centre of Excellence, Professor of European Studies, ICS (page: eight)

• “European Union: A citizen’s perspective” by Bruno van den Elshout, Journalist and photographer (page 11)

• “Communicating Europe: How can this Utopia come about?” by Geoff Martin, Special Adviser to the Commonwealth Secretary General on Strategic Relationships (page 12)

• “Greece and Sarkozy’s “Union for the Mediterranean””, by George Tassiopoulos PhD candidate in political science University of East-Paris (page: 13)

• “Debate: European Communication Policy biased propaganda?”, by Silke Stumvoll, journalist, stagiaire at a Communication and information Unit of the Commission (page: 14)

•”Publication of Special JCER issue on Media and Communication in Europe: Babel Revisited”, by Agnes Inge Schneeberger, PhD candidate, ICS (page: 15)

 

jmece_lab_event
Activities of the project “Europe in my eyes”, supported by the European Parliament.
Project “Europe in my eyes”

The Jean Monnet European Centre of Excellence and the JMECE Lab, based in Institute of Communication Studies, has organised a one day conference in Leeds Civic Hall on Friday 13th March, 2009 between 10.00 a.m. and 16.00 p.m.

This event is intended to bring together young people from Leeds to look at engaging them in the forthcoming European Elections. To that end, a number of MEPs and speakers from the University, together with EU students in ICS, will be giving talks, holding round table debates and also showing a JMECE produced film.

The conference is part of our own research on citizenship, the public sphere and mediated governance and addresses the EU’s and its member states’ attempts to use new media to mobilise interest among citizens in democratic engagement.

Speakers include MEPs for Yorkshire and Humber, media practitioners, academics, researchers, local authorities and first time young voters from Britain and other EU countries. Issues to be discussed include voting in Euro-elections, young people’s views of the EU, its priorities, policies and the future of democracy. We would like to thank Lynette Falconer, Information Development Manager, Leeds Europe Direct at Leeds City Council for her support. Activities of the project “Europe in my eyes”, supported by the European Parliament.

In conjuction with: leeds_city_council

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Download the registraton form HERE

Downlaod the poster of the event HERE

Download the draft programme HERE


You and the Future of Democracy in Europe

Conference at Leeds Civic Hall, 13th March 2009, 10am-4pm


10.00 Welcome and Introduction. [speaker TBC]

PANEL 1: EU elections and EU citizenship

10.15 What future? What democracy? What’s the point of Euro-elections? Prof Juliet Lodge, JMECE, University of Leeds

10.30 The European Parliament in perspective. Dermot Scott, Head of the UK Office of the European Parliament

10.50 European elections, political participation and mobilisation of young people. Fabro Steibel, Francisco Seoane Perez and Stergios Mavrikis, JMECE Lab.

“Do it like a European?”: a film for first time voters by first time voters, marking the “50th anniversary of the European Parliament and 30 years since the first Euro-elections”. The film will be introduced by Leeds University Communications students, the Director Ali Dickinson, the Producer Vivienne Errington-Barnes and the Script-writer Nick Miller.

11.00 Screening of the short film “Do it like a European?”

11.30 Tea break

PANEL 2: Communicating Europe?

11.45 Boring, Irrelevant and Over there! The Media and Europe. Judith Stamper, Institute of Communication Studies, University of Leeds

12.00 Britain and Europe: Ignorance is Bliss! Geoffrey Martin, Special Adviser to the Commonwealth Secretary on Strategic Relationships

12.15 Protecting Citizens in Europe. DCI Dave Fortune

12.30 Lunch

Stands by Europe Direct, JMECE Lab and European Movement with material for distribution

PANEL 3: Your chance to talk to European MEPs

13.30 Green Europe: Political Choices. Diana Wallis, MEP, Liberal Democrat

13.50 What has European Parliament ever done for you? Dr Richard Corbett MEP, Labour.

14.10 Consuls-supporting you abroad. Mark Green, Honorary German Consul

14.20 Round table – with MEPs, including Dr Richard Corbett MEP Labour; Diana Wallis MEP Liberal Democrats; Godfrey Bloom MEP UKIP; and Mark Green Honorary German Consul. Moderated by Prof Juliet Lodge.

15.00 Tea break

PANEL 4 : European Union from the citizens’ perspective

15.15 What Use are Euro parties? Dr Simon Lightfoot, University of Leeds

15.30 The Role of Europe Direct Network: getting Information about Europe, studying and working elsewhere in Europe. Lynette Falconer, Leeds Europe Direct

15.40 Working for an idea: internship and employment at the European Union. Dr Alina Dobreva, European Commission stagiaire and Christina Michael, journalist working for Europa.eu

15.50 The European Movement – why it matters, and what it can do. Neill Schofield, the European Movement

16.00 Closing Speaker: Who’s European Now? Dr Katharine Sarikakis, University of Leeds

Special activity: The FOCUS GROUPS on ‘YOUR VISION OF EUROPE’ will convene at 15.00 – 16.0o

"You and the future of democracy in the EU" poster

"You and the future of democracy in the EU" poster

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"The European Parliament is only a “rhetorical champion” in the fight against climate change, with “limited impact” in shaping environmental agreements in the EU and the world. "

"The European Parliament is only a “rhetorical champion” in the fight against climate change, with “limited impact” in shaping environmental agreements in the EU and the world. "

Climate change event in Leeds

by FRANCISCO SEOANE PÉREZ

The European Parliament is only a “rhetorical champion” in the fight against climate change, with “limited impact” in shaping environmental agreements in the EU and the world. The current economic crisis, along with the shift of the centre of gravity of the EU to the East of the continent, are the two main reasons behind the watering-down by European governments of the ambitious so-called “climate legislative package” outlined by European representatives. These were the conclusions of a study on the role of the European Parliament in environmental policy-making presented at a seminar about climate change sponsored by the Jean Monnet European Centre of Excellence on 27 January 2009 at the Leeds Business School. The event was a prelude to the official inauguration of the Climate Change Centre on Economics and Policy at the University of Leeds.

JMECE Lab member Heidrun Herzogenrath-Amelung and Fabro Steibel

JMECE Lab member Heidrun Herzogenrath-Amelung and Fabro Steibel

The European Parliament aimed at making of EU countries the most advanced in the world in the fight against climate change. Although the ambitious goals of reducing contaminating emissions by 20 per cent by 2020 (as compared to the levels of emissions in the 1990s), and raising the percentage of renewable energy consumption from the current 8 per cent to a 20 per cent have been formally endorsed by the European governments, the final legislation is full of opt-outs so as to leave with little or no punishment the failure to achieve those self-imposed limits. The current economic crisis was the “perfect excuse” for countries like Poland and Italy to justify their opposition to the text submitted by the European Parliament, said Dr Charlotte Burns, a political scientist at the University of Leeds, who presented the initial results of a research project on EU environmental policy and politics conducted with her colleague Dr Neil Carter, a professor from the University of York. The centre of gravity of European politics has moved eastwards, giving more power to countries who are still heavily reliant on coal-generated power. The enlargement and the current financial crisis are the two factors that explain why “all actors were ready for any kind of deal”, according to Dr Burns. Had been otherwise, she said, the European Parliament may have rejected the legislation eventually approved. “The downgraded climate package has weakened the position of the Union as regards to the rest of the world”, said Dr Burns. The EU no longer can expect to lecture world leaders on how to fight global warming at the forthcoming international meeting in Copenhagen in December 2009.

Dr Charlotte Burns, political scientist at the University of Leeds

Dr Charlotte Burns, political scientist at the University of Leeds

Comparing US and Europe

Dr Angela Carpenter, an expert on environmental legislation from the School of Earth and Environment at the University of Leeds, reported on an on-going research project that aims at comparing the energy efficiency of oil refineries around the world, with a special attention on the question of whether those countries or states with stricter environmental regulations contaminate less. Although strong conclusions on causality cannot be raised from the data available, Dr Carpenter showed that US states with more rigorous environmental regulation like California are less polluting. This research project, led by Professor Andy Gouldson, the head of the Sustainability Research Institute at the University of Leeds, is finding more difficulties than expected when trying to compare US and EU data on environmental issues. EU countries do not follow yet standarised procedures for collecting data on some of the parameters of interest, said Dr Carpenter.

Yorkshire and the Humber, a carbon-intensive region
Dr Stephen Brown, the Sustainable Development Manager at the regional development agency Yorkshire Forward, reported on the local strategy to reduce carbon emissions. Mr Brown said that, along with the Ruhr in Germany, Yorkshire and the Humber has the record of highest emissions of CO2 in Europe. “Yorkshire is an intensive CO2 economy”, acknowledged Dr Brown. However, regional businesses have been willing to co-operate in tackling this issue, showing interest in some of the regional agency’s recent initiatives, such as plans for the capture and storage of carbon to minimise the release of CO2 into the atmosphere, and a trial “cap and trade” system for carbon. This programme, known as Carbon Action Yorkshire, is intended as a training for the forthcoming implementation of new national and EU legislation that will ask companies to buy pollution permits from other businesses that may have not reached their maximum limit of contamination. In theory, this system would penalize polluters and would reward those who are more energy efficient. Carbon Action Yorkshire is the UK’s first regional carbon trading scheme, remarked Dr Brown.

Climate Change Centre

Dr Stephen Brown, the Sustainable Development Manager at the regional development agency Yorkshire Forward

Dr Stephen Brown, the Sustainable Development Manager at the regional development agency Yorkshire Forward

This panel session on European environmental legislation and its implications to the regional economy in the Yorkshire was the prelude to the launch of the new Centre on Climate Change, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, and based at the School of Earth and Environment at the University of Leeds, in partnership with the London School of Economics and Political Science.

More information on the new centre at:
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/media/press_releases/current09/cccep.html

Powerpoint presentation of the event:

Dr Stephen Brown / A Low Carbon Economy For Yorkshire and Humber

Dr Angela Carpenter / Benchmarking Petroleum Refinery Environmental Performance

Dr Charlotte Burns & Professor Neil Carter / Championing Europe’s Environment?: The European Parliament and Climate Change

AGENDA of the Event:

Speakers:

Dr Charlotte Burns & Dr Neil Carter, University of York and Dr Charlotte Burns, University of Leeds
“Championing Europe’s Environment? The European Parliament and Climate Change”

Dr Angela Carpenter, University of Leeds “Benchmarking Petroleum Refinery Environmental Performance: A Comparative Study of Performance in the US and EU”

Dr Stephen Brown, Yorkshire Forward “Yorkshire Forward perspectives on the development of a low carbon economy for Yorkshire and Humberside”

Venue: University of Leeds Business School (Room 1.33) / Times: 1.00 p.m. to 2.45 p.m.

Also, please notice that the Europa website hosts an interesting page about Climate Change (visit ec.europa.eu/environment/climat/home_en.htm )

Ready and TH!NKing ABOUT IT

The JMECE Lab will be in Brussels on 26 January to kick off the first Europe-wide blogging competition!

The JMECE Lab will be in Brussels on 26 January to kick off the first Europe-wide blogging competition!

A dynamic community of bloggers, journalists and journalism students; a forum alive with debate and discussion; a creative portal to inspire youth involvement with the 2009 Parliamentary Elections – brought to you by the European Journalism Centre (EJC).

Travelling from every member state of the European Union, 81 bloggers will come together in Brussels on 26 January to kick off the first Europe-wide blogging competition, TH!NK ABOUT IT. The two-day launch event kicks off a blogging competition running until the European Parliamentary Elections in June.

TH!NK ABOUT IT will host bloggers from each EU member state in a a forum alive with debate and discussion – a dynamic online community of bloggers, journalists and journalism students sharing their thoughts on the EU and the upcoming European elections.

The bloggers, all individually invited and registered, are asked to cover, report, critique and debate on campaign issues and candidates. The goal is to get Europeans to TH!NK ABOUT IT and to express their views on Europe.

The bloggers, all individually invited and registered, are asked to cover, report, critique and debate on campaign issues and candidates. The goal is to get Europeans to TH!NK ABOUT IT and to express their views on Europe.

The bloggers, all individually invited and registered, are asked to cover, report, critique and debate on campaign issues and candidates. The goal is to get Europeans to TH!NK ABOUT IT and to express their views on Europe.

At the kickoff, invitees are briefed on the European blogsphere, European Parliament, elections and on understanding the EU from a journalist’s perspective. Between 4 and 7 June 2009, citizens of the European Union will be called upon to elect, for the seventh time, their representatives to the European Parliament, which will at that time be celebrating thirty years of election by direct universal suffrage.

This briefing will offer journalists from the EU 27 Member States access to in-depth information as well as opportunities to meet and exchange words with key players concerning the challenges related to the lack of identification, political debate and effective European leadership. The programme will also provide a comprehensive overview on the development of the campaign throughout Europe in the first semester of 2009 and the fundamental role political parties and the mass media played. The two-day event in Brussels will additionally be tailored as a useful platform for networking and creating contacts with EU officials, lobbyists, researchers and other stakeholders.

Useful Link about Euro-elections:

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/elections2009/default.htm?language=EN

 

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You will also have the opportunity to network with fellow business women as well as influence and discuss your needs with local and European key policy makers

We would like to invite those interested in Europe to attend our coming event in Hull, “Future Challenges for Europe : The EU combating Modern Day Slavery”. The event will take place on March 6th, at the Hull City Hall, from 10-3pm.

Would you like to know how Europe could help you build your business?

Do you want to know what help is available now for both business, family and social development?

Would you like to directly impact decision makers in Brussels?

 

Then BOOK NOW for this exciting opportunity to attend ‘Making Europe Work for Women’. This is a ticket only event, and spaces are limited. Speakers include: Dr Richard Corbett, MEP for Yorkshire and Humber & Christian Krappitz, European Commission.

This will be an interactive day with opportunity for us to participate in every session. Our views will be collated into a report to be taken back to Europe to help inform and shape policy and practical support for women. This is part of a national exercise to understand better what women need and want from Europe in relation to business support, our lives, wellbeing, mobility and security. The aim is to seek our opinions on the ways we hear about European issues, their impression and relevance to us and if they meet our needs and to send our important messages back to help shape the future.

You will also have the opportunity to network with fellow business women as well as influence and discuss your needs with local and European key policy makers. There will also be a display and networking area for attendees to meet member organisations of Yorkshire Women Entrepreneurs and other support bodies.

Your chance to talk to European MEP’s
Your chance to directly inform Europe’s support for women
Your chance to contribute to shaping policy

Event Programme:


10.30 Arrival and networking

11.00 Opening by the Lord Mayor of Hull – Councillor Elaine Garland

11.15 Young Entrepreneurs 

Young people developing businesses through Enterprising Young People     demonstrate their creativity and entrepreneurial spirit.

11.30 Managing Diverse Expectations

Are you working, caring for family young and old, supporting someone disabled, or probably juggling across them all? Let’s discuss the practical implications and the support Europe should be focusing on.

12.00 The EU: The Real Special Relationship for British Business Today

Dr Andrew Robinson, Chairman, French Business Council “Managing Our Businesses through the Recession. What support can we access through Europe? Find out what’s out there and feedback whether it is relevant to meet our needs.”

12.30 Combating cross border crime: a local response to European issues – from a safe internet to human trafficking

Chief Inspector David Fortune & Christian Krappitz, European Commission, London.
What can we and Europe do about it?

13.00 Buffet Lunch with Richard Corbett, MEP / An opportunity to network and talk with Richard

13.30 What does Europe offer? What do we need?

Dr Richard Corbett, Member of the European Parliament for Yorkshire and Humber “How the information gained from us today will be used in practice.”

14.15 “Focus Group: What do we need and want from Europe?” Prof Juliet Lodge, European Woman of Europe, University of Leeds.

Your opportunity to discuss what matters to women in Europe and what we need from Europe, including practical support, information and access. Join in the focus group so that your views can be heard and inform a report for the EU.

15.15 Closing – Maureen Foers, OBE / Yorkshire Women Entrepreneurs – Opportunity for networking

16.00 Event closes

 

There will also be a focus group session on the Euro elections for which participants are sought.

Registration csfbs@leeds.ac.uk

Website

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"Your chance to talk to European MEP's"

In association with:

 

Production of a short film  marking the “50th anniversary of the European Parliament and 30 years since the first Euro-elections”

Production of a short film marking the “50th anniversary of the European Parliament and 30 years since the first Euro-elections”

Future activities of the project, “Europe in my eyes”, (supported by the European Parliament)

8th-11th December 2009
Film on young people’s views on Europe / Filming in Brussels

JMECE LAB team will film parts of the Euro-film in Brussels this December. The focus of this production is the European elections, political participation and mobilization of young people and how young people perceive themselves as European citizens with the right to vote for the European Parliament. ICS Broadcast Journalism undergraduates have a special role in this project under the direction of Judith Stamper, ICS Programme Head of Broadcast Journalism.

Script/production supervisors: Stergios Mavrikis & Fabro Steibel,

Initial Idea: JMECE Lab members May Jacobs, Stergios Mavrikis, Agnes Inge Schneeberger, Fabro Steibel, Anna Zoellner.

Producer: Vivienne Errington-Barnes.

Director: Ali Dickinson.

Writer: Nick Miller.

Ass. Producer: Maya Manwaring,  Camera: Joe Davis, A.D.:Anna Spragg, D.O.P: Charles Woods, Editor : Will Lock, Script Political Supervisor: Luke Errington-Barnes, Hair & Make-up: Jessie Young, P.D.: Laura Smith, Special Effects: Will Lock, Composer: Howard Carter, Ass. Writer: Emma Brown, Lighting: Tom Lane, Lighting Ass.: Jonny Hughes, Boom/Grip: Alex Darwin, Ass. Script Political Supervisor: Sundeep Kumar, Production Design Ass.: Cameron Carswell, Costume: Jinny Howarth, Costume Ass.: Klaudia Stoniek, Researcher (film): Amy Moorcroft, Production Ass.: Cristina Cretu, Runner: Teresa Lee, Runner: Edmund Perou, Runner: Lucy Dixon, Research Heads (politics): Lauren Worrall, Renata Cordeiro, Emma Preston, Sound Editor: Lee Charallah, Animation Composer: Callum Oliver.

12

Click here to download

The November/December 2008 4th newsletter of the JMECE Lab (www.jmecelab.com) here at the Institute of Communications Studies is available. Click here to donwload.

Inside this issue:

• “The role of the EU in combating the financial crisis” by Dr. Richard Corbett MEP (Labour) (page: 4)

• “JMECE Lab at European Youth Media Days in Brussels” by Francisco Seoane Perez, PhD candidate (page: 5)

• “User Perceptions of EU institutions & communicator perceptions of their users” by Talke K. Hoppmann, PhD candidate (page: 6)

• “Northern Ireland : the Region that came in from the cold” by Goeff Martin, Special Adviser to the Commonwealth Secretary General on Strategic Relationships

• “Studying the beast on the wall of death” by Judith Stamper, Principal Teaching Fellow in Broadcast Journalism at ICS (page: 10)

• “Stagiaire’s Notes from Brussels” by Alina Dobreva, PhD candidate (page: 12)

• “Stagiaire at the EC / Like a little child at its first School day” by Silke Stumvoll, Journalist (page: 13)

• “British Euro-scepticism and why we should embrace closer European ties” by Adam Cooper, MA student (Politics) (page: 14)

• “European Researchers’ Online Behaviour 2008” by Angela Joyce, Research Officer for Intute (page: 15)

• “The Network of European Studies (SENT)” by Federiga Bindi SENT Coordinator and Jean Monnet Chair at the University of Rome Tor Vergata (page: 16)

• “Intercultural Dialogue: Best Practices at Community level” by Lynette Falconer, Information Development Manager, Library and Information Service, Leeds City Council (page: 20)

JMECE Lab news:

• “A new approach to communicating Europe” by Heidrun Herzogenrath-Amelung, MA student

• “Minister for Europe, Caroline Flint MP visits JMECE” by Pinelopi Troulinou, MA student (page 19)

• “The Jean Monnet European Centre and the JMECE Lab welcome the EU’s 26 Ambassadors in UK” by Nicole Barbosa, MA student (page 9)

Click http://www.box.net/shared/672ajlfh80 to download it.

jmece_lab_event

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University of Leeds, 31st October 2008

French Ambassador in UK, His Excellency Maurice Gourdault-Montagne, visited the University of Leeds on behalf of the EU French Presidency. He was accompanied by representatives of all the EU’s Embassies in UK. The event included talks and Q&A session organised by the JMECE Lab.

Download the report of that event

For a set of photos please click bellow:


dsc_0967img_1031img_1056

Listen to an audio compilation:

See the video of that event: (not yet available)

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Eurominister Caroline Flint with JMECE Lab members Stergios Mavrikis, Francisco Seoane Pérez, Fabro Steibel and Professor Juliet Lodge

Eurominister Caroline Flint with JMECE Lab members Stergios Mavrikis, Francisco Seoane Pérez, Fabro Steibel and Professor Juliet Lodge

Title: “Future Visions of Europe”

Speaker: Minister for Europe, Caroline Flint MP

When: Thursday 23rd October at 13.30 to 14.30 p.m.

Venue: Stage One at the School of Performance and Cultural Industries. This building can be found to the left of the Student Union Building, when facing the main entrance.

The Minister will speak for 20-30 minutes after which there will be a Q&A session

All welcome

This event is part of the Future Visions of Europe and Europe in my eyes projects supported by the EU Commission and the European Parliament. For further details please see: www.jmecelab.com

Report of the event published by “Yorkshire Post”

Britain “must accept EU role in crisis”

Published Date: 24 October 2008

By Tom Smithard

Britons do not need to love the European Union – but need to appreciate its role in solving the current financial crisis, the European Minister said yesterday.

Caroline Flint, MP for the Don Valley, said Europe has brought benefits to Yorkshire such as increased investment and more jobs.

In her inaugural speech in her new role, given at Leeds University yesterday, the former Housing Minister and Yorkshire Minister outlined her vision for the future of Europe. For more click HERE.

Caroline Flint supports the UK's role in the European Union

Caroline Flint supports the UK's role in the European Union

"Communicating Europe"

Caroline Flint talking to MA students. Topic of discussion: "Communicating Europe"

Watch the video of that event:

Click here for the EuroBlogFest:

Prize won

The JMECE docudrama “Do it like a European?” wins prize at the international Winton Film Contest

Visit our Special Euro Elections section:

Activities supported by:

UK Office of the European Parliament

UK Office of the European Parliament *

EU Commission Representation in the UK

EU Commission Representation in the UK *

Supported by:

University of Leeds
Jean Monnet European Centre of Excellence

Jean Monnet European Centre of Excellence

Institute of Communications Studies

A member of:

Sent - Thematic Network of European Studies

Sent - Thematic Network of European Studies

Sign up for news

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CLICK HERE

PRIVACY POLICY: Your email will never be sold, given or used by any other organization.

Visit our group at Facebook

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Dr Richard Corbett, MEP welcomes the JMECE LAB

“Congratulations to Leeds ICS in being a step ahead of the rest of Europe in this interesting initiative.”

JMECE LAB photo collection

Disclaimer:

*

Disclaimer: We are pleased to acknowledge the support of the European Parliament and the European Commission, and the Jean Monnet European Centre of Excellence, University of Leeds. They are not responsible for the content of our pages, or of any material displayed.

JMECE Lab logo © Talke Hoppmann & Fabro Steibel Copyright © 2008 JMECE Lab

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